Browsing: UNiCEF

Africans, starting from governments, startups, non-governmental organizations, and generally all the people in the continent, are losing much more for failing to adapt to the advancements in the digital world
Artists ranging from painters, drawers, actors, musicians, sculptors and writers can now sell their pieces of art across the world as Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs)
Every day, new games are launching on the metaverse and you can buy an altcoin in a game and earn real money from it!
bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies are a store of value and could be a haven asset in times of tu...

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Agriculture is contributes 23 percent of African GDP, Mckinsey 2019
At least 43.8 percent of people are employed in the agriculture sector
Only 5-6 percent of arable land in Africa is irrigated

Agriculture in Africa has not only an economic value but a cultural significance.  It is time to transform the economy and lives of African farmers. Africa is home to nearly 60 percent of the world’s arable land. Over the past decade, African agriculture has faced a number of shocks which beg for technological transformation. Farming in Africa contributes greatly to the welfare of most rura...

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  • Learning poverty is costing African young learners dearly
  • Median international school fees in Africa span from US$4000 to US$10000 in Africa
  • Free education in Africa is now available across most countries.

Education is the most valuable investment any country can have, but the COVID-19 pandemic places this priceless activity in a rather unprecedented position, threatening the fate of the next generation.

Various numbers and figures  make the latter clearer. According to International Schools Database, Median international school fees in Africa span from US$4000 to US$10,000 in Africa. According to a 2020 based study on 14 countries, the average spending mark on education in Africa was 4.77 per cent.

Out of 53 countries, at least more than 40 provide free education to children in Africa. These numbers are a glimpse of how education is crucial to developing economies, Africa to be specific.

Read: World Bank invests in East Africa’s vocational education

  • UNICEF said that the situation in the Eastern and southern regions is dire and any minimal cut in their humanitarian operations in the region could further irk the already long-running crisis.
  • The United Nations agency said in a statement in Nairobi, Kenya that at least 1.5 million children were lacking life-saving treatment for severe wasting in Southern and Eastern Africa.
  • In medium and low-income countries, learning losses due to school closures caused by COVID-19 have left up to 70 per cent of 10-year-olds unable to read or understand a simple text, up from 53 per cent in 2019.

The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) has appealed for US$255 million to revamp its emergency response in Eastern and Southern Africa in 2022.

UNICEF said that they will also direct the funds towards the treatment of severe wasting and supporting children with adequate and better-quality nutrition services.

The United Nations agency said …

  • Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA), and UNICEF said the financing will help sustain national immunization programs
  • These will include COVID-19 vaccination campaigns, and enable the timely procurement of essential health supplies while domestic financing is mobilized
  • Access to diagnostics, treatments, vaccines and other essential health supplies is critical to ensuring that countries can protect their people against COVID-19 and other health threats

Three organizations have announced a $150 million financial guarantee to help UNICEF procure vaccines and other health-related supplies for low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).

The three, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA), and UNICEF said the financing will help sustain national immunization programs.

These will include COVID-19 vaccination campaigns, and enable the timely procurement of essential health supplies while domestic financing is mobilized.

The financing will be effective through 2025.

According to the partners, many …

  • Airtel Africa and UNICEF said the deal will see them connect schools to the internet and ensure free access to learning platforms across 13 countries
  • Airtel Africa is the first African private sector partner to make a multimillion-dollar commitment to ‘Reimagine Education’, a global initiative launched by UNICEF in 2020

Airtel Africa and UNICEF have entered into a five-year pan-African partnership to help accelerate the roll-out of digital learning.

In a statement, the partners said the deal will see them connect schools to the internet and ensure free access to learning platforms across 13 countries.

These are Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Gabon, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia.

Airtel Africa has revealed that its financial and in-kind contribution for this partnership is $57 million over five years to 2027.

By providing equal access to quality digital learning, particularly for the most vulnerable children, …

A small oil and gas exploration company that has offices in Africa, North America and United Kingdom is drilling into what it believes could be a massive onshore oil deposit under and alongside an ecologically and culturally important swath of the Kalahari Desert in northeast Namibia and northwest Botswana.

The firm known as Reconnaissance Energy Africa {ReconAfrica} says its Continued research findings present a picture of generating 100 billion barrels of oil and gas, a quantity roughly equal in volume to the proven oil reserves of Kuwait or the United Arab Emirates.

This Timely and good news however are facing a probable opposition from two United bodies and other independent entities who are arguing that in an event of this it will threaten local water supplies as well as the livelihoods of Indigenous people as the  exploration site is found in a region also home to two United Nations Educational, …

Boosting agricultural production has for years been believed to be the solution to world hunger and malnourishment.

However, years of intensive farming, increased chemical fertilizers and pesticides use has done little to successfully address food insecurity.

While food rations may have increased as a result of intensive farming, there is a new kind of hunger which this increase cannot address. The lack of essential micronutrients necessary for growth and development is not caused not by a lack of food only but food that does not have them.

Read: Biofortified foods: Answering Africa’s nutritional deficiencies, challenges

These micronutrients include vitamins and minerals such as iodine, vitamin A, iron, zinc, calcium, and many others and their effects on human health can be irreversible. For example, without iodine, children are susceptible to brain damage.

UNICEF, the UN body that handles issues affecting children notes that the most devastating impacts of lacking iodine occur …

The Government of Sweden gave $4.4 million to the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) to support Uganda’s COVID-19 response and efforts towards the continued delivery of essential health services for pregnant and breastfeeding women, young children, newborns and adolescents.

UNICEF and its partners have continued to help Uganda in controlling, containing and mitigating the impact of COVID-19 pandemic. The organization is mostly focused on strengthening access to essential services like health care.

Due to restrictions on movement and fears of contracting the virus, many women and children have missed out on much-needed health care, including newborn and maternal care, HIV medications, vaccinations and nutrition services, exposing them to heightened danger.

Also Read:Redefining the health system in Africa after the pandemic

“Few things could be more important right now than supporting people’s health. It is extremely important that antenatal, delivery, and postnatal services, along with different levels of emergency care …

The Afro-pop, Congolese zouk, and the Nigerian melodies, to mention the least have been the pinnacle of entertainment attention and musical success in Africa over the past decade. The ascension of modern technology, especially the decent access to internet services and gadgets has made Africa to be united in Music.

And yet, an array of Africa’s best musical talents is slated to put the region to a rather vital spotlight on Monday 25, 2020, to raise funds for thousands of people affected by the COVID-19 outbreak.

This means one more, the world will have unmetered access to see how the continent of more than 1 billion people, use music as an aggregator of relief but define the next step towards reopening its $2.5 trillion economies.

The Industry

Africa music industry is undoubtedly growing. Deezer a streaming platform which connects 14 million monthly active users around the world to 56 million …