Browsing: UNEP

14 resolutions were adopted at the 5th UN Environment Assembly in Nairobi, with the goal of enhancing efforts to meet the Sustainable Development Goals while also protecting nature.

International environmental governance is overseen by the United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA), a group of 193 countries that meets every two years.

Plastic pollution will be tackled by an Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee, which will have the responsibility of drafting an international legally binding accord.

Read: Plastic waste exports from wealthy countries poisoning Africans

According to UN Environment Program (UNEP) Executive Director Inger Andersen, this is the most significant environmental multilateral agreement since the Paris agreement.

According to Norway’s Minister for Climate and Environment, Espen Barth Eide, “multilateral collaboration at its best” is demonstrated by “the UN Environment Assembly.” Is plastic pollution a public health crisis?” Having made today’s pledge, we are now officially on the path to a cure.”

There is no …

  • The fifth session of the United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA-5.2) resolved to end plastic pollution and forge an international legally binding agreement by 2024
  • The agreement will hold nations, businesses, and society accountable for eliminating plastic pollution from the environment
  • UNEP) Executive Director Inger Andersen described the agreement as the most important international multilateral environmental deal since the Paris climate accord

This week was a win for climate change after the fifth session of the United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA-5.2) resolved to end plastic pollution and forge an international legally binding agreement by 2024.

The agreement will hold nations, businesses, and society accountable for eliminating plastic pollution from the environment.

After the passing the landmark resolution in Nairobi, UN Environment Programme (UNEP) Executive Director Inger Andersen described the agreement as the most important international multilateral environmental deal since the Paris climate accord.

Representatives, including heads of state, from 175 countries, …

  • Using an EV motorcycle saves an upward of 40% of petrol consumption.
  • Fika Mobility says that electric bikes will save Boda Boda riders an estimated US$700 used in maintenance and petrol costs a year.
  • Air pollution has contributed to over 1.1 million deaths in Africa as of 2019.

Electric motorcycles popularity is growing exponentially in Kenya, Africa. precisely because of the increase in prices of fuels and the shouting campaign over climate change.

The automotive industry is experiencing a revolution from battery-powered vehicles to electric commuter vehicles. One of the companies driving the insurgency in East Africa is Fika Mobility.

Fika Mobility

Fika is a startup that began operating in Ruiru, Kenya, in July 2019. The company assembles battery-powered motorcycles that have zero emissions to the environment.

Read: Opinus secures Sub-Saharan Africa’s largest-ever fundraise in electric mobility

Commuter and freight motorbike operators are seeing massive changes to their bottom …

The UN Environment Programme (UNEP) has launched a pilot electric bikes project with forty-nine motorcycles at Nairobi’s Karura Forest.

Following the pilot phase in four locations in Kenya, the project is expected to expand in an effort to reduce air pollution, improve national energy security and create green jobs.

The launch follows data showing that Kenya is importing more motorcycles than cars, doubling its fleet every 7-8 years. UNEP Deputy Executive Director Joyce Msuya says that these imports are generally inefficient and poorly maintained polluting motorcycles.

Read: SGR electric upgrade to cost Sh49bn more – Kenya

Kenya’s electricity is very green in 2019 with more than 80 per cent was generated by hydro, solar, geothermal, and wind. Shifting to electric bikes in Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda and elsewhere will reduce costs, air pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions, as well as create jobs.

The average motorcycle is estimated to be 10 times …

Migration is significantly contributing to Africa’s urban growth as people move from rural areas in search of better economic opportunities. Some are also fleeing the effects of environmental degradation which has led to lost livelihoods for those who rely on agriculture.

As the economies deteriorate continent-wide, the mass movement of people means that the capacity of urban towns to cater for the increasing demands by migrants is stretched beyond the original plans.

This means that providing employment and access to basic amenities are limited which leads to breakdowns in service provision and delivery.

Read: World Bank to invest $593 million to support projects in Tanzania

By 2050, 75 per cent of the global population will be living in urban centres with sub-Saharan Africa being the world’s fastest urbanizing region.

This is according to a 2014 report by the United Nations Population Division which projected that most of this urban growth …

Africa still has a long way to go in terms of universal electricity access.

To achieve this universal access to energy, the continent does not have to rely on dirty power to grow its economies across the multifaceted sectors.

As of 2010, 80 per cent of Africans relied on biomass energy especially in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) according to the World Bank. This population relied on wood, crop and animal residues to meeting their household needs- mainly cooking.

Nothing much has changed to improve this statistic with only a slight improvement to 65 per cent still relying on wood fuel for cooking by 2050.

Read: Ethiopia: Power shortage, mega-dam and a diplomatic tiff

Last year, the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) launched a report showing that urgent action is needed to address the consumption of biomass as a source of energy in Africa.

With pollution of the environment through degrading practices leading …