Browsing: Tunisia

Japan has pledged to prioritize quality over quantity in its aid to Africa. Prime Minister Fumio Kishida has pledged to maintain and expand Abe’s interest in Africa.

Tokyo has always financed a variety of projects in different sectors. A decade ago, Japan financed a new container terminal in Mozambique’s port of Nacala and Kenya’s main port, Mombasa. Now, renewables are favoured to promote development and maximize Japanese expertise.

Tokyo financed the April completion of Unit 6 at Kenya’s Olkaria geothermal site. It provided a US$746 million low-interest loan to finance the new project and the transmission lines needed to connect the plant to the rest of the country. Fuji Electric Global and Marubeni Corporation did the work. Japanese firms supply more geothermal turbines than the rest of the world combined, and JICA finances geothermal projects worldwide.

During this edition, the Tunisian private sector will offer 81 investment projects totalling US$2.7 billion dollars to investors from Africa and Japan. 37,750 employment opportunities will be created by the initiatives listed in a white paper by the Tunisian-Japanese Chamber of Commerce and Industry (CCITJ).

The 128-page white paper includes proposed projects by firms. This is in addition to new projects and those that are already in place and looking for possible partners. These initiatives will be carried out as a result of a triangular relationship between Japan, Tunisia, and other African nations in fields with a high added value.

Some of these projects include 21 in the green and blue economy, the digital industry, artificial intelligence and space technologies (20), pharmaceutical and medical (17), industrial (12), infrastructure and logistics (9) and two in finance.

While Russia’s preferred visions and modes of action in the Maghreb seem to be fairly well identified, the perceptions and expectations, but also the possible reservations on the Maghreb are more rarely expressed by the leaders of these countries and little-studied at the academic level.

Perhaps we should look at this, as far as the powers that be are concerned, a concern for discretion regarding the sensitive aspects of this foreign policy component – this is particularly true for Algeria – an area on which they generally communicate little and for the academic research community in North Africa, a lack of knowledge related to the history, geography and culture of contemporary Russia.

If there is undoubtedly, on the Maghreb side and with important nuances from one country to another, a manifest interest in a development or a deepening of the partnership with Moscow, questions may remain about Russia’s objectives, especially in Rabat and Tunis.