Browsing: Nigeria

Big cap stocks are far more profitable with ROE’s of 67 per cent compared to 21 per cent for mid cap stocks. Further, their stock market returns are superior to mid-cap stocks.

Nestle Nigeria had the highest on Return on Equity of 215.4 per cent with a share price at 1,215.00 NGN. While, International Breweries had the lowest Return on Equity of a negative 2.5 per cent with a share price at 4.95 NGN as of September 30, 2022.

Nestle Nigeria Plc listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange is a food manufacturing and marketing company in Nigeria and a subsidiary of the largest food and beverage company in the world. The company produces an extensive range of products for the retail and wholesale sectors.

The Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) has announced that it would redesign the country’s N200, N500 and N1, 000. The change would be done to reduce the amount of money in circulation and control inflation, according to the CBN Governor, Godwin Emefiele.

The CBN highlighted concerns of “illicit” funds in circulation, which it said bandits and kidnappers had been exploiting in perpetrating their crimes.

The regulator said as much as 85 per cent of currency in circulation were outside the vaults of the country’s banks, encouraging criminality, currency hoarding and reducing the efficacy of the central bank’s monetary policies.

There is still plenty to accomplish. Even after a year, the PIA is still in a transitional period, with committees deliberating its practical implications. One seasoned Nigerian expert questioned how much the NNPC would change due to its transition into a limited liability corporation. Still, post-PIA data suggests that Nigeria’s oil and gas industry may be moving in the right direction.

Much like it did in South America, EBANX wants to centre its strategy on collaborations and partnerships with global merchants. The company processes payments for Uber, Airbnb, and over 1,000 digital companies throughout Latin America.

In a statement, the CEO and co-founder, João Del Valle, explained that although Africa’s digital economy is still nascent, its exciting potential motivated his company’s decision. “Africa’s fast-growing digital economy is only in its early days, and it’s projected to grow up and to the right for the next few decades. Together with local players, EBANX will be a catalyst to realize the many benefits of a digital economy even faster.”

“Expanding our solutions to African countries speaks directly to EBANX’s mission of creating access, and having Pipefy as a merchant makes this moment even more special to us, expanding solutions and services throughout regions full of opportunities,” Paula Bellizia, the President of Global Payments at EBANX, said in a statement.

In June 2022, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) revealed that Nigeria had not handed over US$ 450 million owed to different airlines. By July 2022, the money owed to foreign airlines had risen by US$14 million to US$464 million.

The funds were generated from ticket sales but were yet to be remitted, leading to friction between Nigerian authorities and international airlines.

The Nigerian federal government attributed the mess to the foreign exchange crisis as the naira continues to weaken against the dollar. IATA asked the West African country to release the funds’ failure, to which it risks being alienated from air connectivity.

Most Kenyans, 83 per cent, indicated a willingness to increase the amount of money they allocate to savings and investments, but the inability to save due to insufficient funds after fulfilling their obligations that require regular funding and the availability of quick digital loans.

Among their obligations which contribute to Kenyans’ financial strain is supporting their extended family which considerably bites into their savings. 84 per cent of people indicated that they regularly provide some income to their extended family, mostly in case of emergencies, because they feel a sense of obligation to send their extended families money and because their extended family members treat them better when they are sent money.

On their part, the extended family members mostly use the money to cater to recurring expenses like food & transport, school fees and medical expenses at 23 per cent, 19 per cent and 18 per cent respectively. Farm-related expenses like purchase of fertiliser ranked fourth at 14 per cent, phone and home upgrades came in fifth at 7 per cent while entertainment like Christmas celebration was sixth.

Rising costs have remained a critical issue in the aftermath of the outbreak. Data from the World Bank/NBS Nigeria – COVID-19 National Longitudinal Phone Survey 2020 reveals that food prices rose rapidly following the pandemic. In March and April, basic food commodity prices increased by 17.2 per cent and 18.37 per cent, respectively. According to the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS), the rise remains the highest in two years.

Recent findings based on comprehensive and long-term monthly food price data have revealed considerable price rises for all chosen food categories during the pandemic. Imported rice and wheat costs, for example, have climbed by 41% and 21%, respectively.

Wheat prices surged by 21% nationally, with considerable increases in price dispersion across markets when the epidemic began, and prices continue to grow.

Wheat is the main component of bread and other products such as noodles, pasta, semolina, and other Nigerian pantry staples. The consumption of these items is higher in cities due to easier market access than in rural regions. Nevertheless, bread remains a major staple throughout the country.

As far back as June 28, 2017, This Day Live said another point to note is that USSD is very important within emerging economies, where the cost to access data services is increasing. Despite the growth of smartphone penetration and 3G/4G coverage, the data access cost is a key factor in deciding how information is consumed.

Meanwhile, the continued reliability of USSD will enable mobile service providers and financial institutions more opportunities to satisfy new market segments, add more value to the customer, and meet underserved customer needs.

In a related article by Myriad Connect published January 29, 2018, the core benefit of USSD is that it doesn’t rely on a data connection to operate, thereby helping reach the billions of people in areas where network coverage is at its most basic or for sectors of the population for whom a data connection is too expensive to access.

So long as a phone can make a call and send a text, then the technology is good to go.