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Tunisia expects deal on IMF loan in weeks, Says central bank governor www.theexchange.africa

Tunisia anticipates striking an agreement with the International Monetary Fund on a credit of between US$2 billion and US$4 billion over three years in the following weeks, according to the central bank governor on Sunday.

“The magnitude is still being negotiated, but I believe it will range betweenUS$2 billion and US$4 billion,” Marouan Abbasi told Reuters. “We aim to achieve a staff level agreement in the next weeks.”

Last week, the authorities and the influential UGTT union agreed to raise public sector salaries by 5%, potentially easing social tensions. They did not, however, declare any additional agreement on reforms required for an IMF bailout.

  • Tunisia anticipates striking an agreement with the International Monetary Fund on a credit of between US$2 billion and US$4 billion over three years in the following weeks
  • The pay deal, according to Abbasi, is a critical step in discussions with the IMF and will provide

Africa’s financial potential has become an interesting prospect for emerging market investors. Three decades ago a proposal to invest in Africa would have been considered ridiculous, but this is no longer the case. In fact, between 2006 and 2011, the continent was registering the highest returns on FDI at 11.4 percent, even higher than Asia at 9.1 percent, while the global average was 7.1 percent. To add to that according to the World Economic Forum, since 2000 "half of the world's fastest-growing economies have been in Africa. As western markets mature and foreign investments saturate in Asia, Latin America, Central and Eastern Europe, and India, Africa is fast becoming the most lucrative investment destination. The inefficient African markets are an excellent source of excess returns, given the level of perceived risks. 

Africa’s Infrastructure Gap 

The persistent low-interest-rate and low-yield environment globally, has led investors to pursue diversification and return-enhancing

Digital economy Africa,

A report jointly produced by Google and the International Finance Corporation titled e-Conomy Africa 2020  projects that Africa’s internet economy is expected to grow into a $180 billion industry by 2025. This would put the contribution of e-based economic activity on the African continent to 5.2% of GDP by the quarter-turn of the century.

The report predicts that Africa’s internet economy will be able to withstand the effects of coronavirus and emerge as a resilient force to drive economic growth on the continent. It notes that opportunities are rife, even with the covid-19 pandemic having affected most economies. This resilience will be based on the rich human resource base in Africa which boasts of polished developers. 

It anticipates that with the digital revolution in play, governments will catch up and introduce policies to support and foster the growth of internet-based businesses across the continent.   Further, investment in