Browsing: gas

Oil and Gas in Tanzania, Oil and Gas in East Africa, LPG in East Africa

According to The Citizen, storage capacity construction tender documents, Kenya looks forward to quickly loading cooking gas for truck distribution, which will likely cut demurrage costs.

“LPG storage capacity in Mombasa is limited and huge demurrage is incurred by LPG ships thus affecting the final consumer price of bottled gas,” read part of KPC tender documents” KPC tender document read in part.

As Tanzania continues to domesticate its natural gas and motivate healthy consumption from households to large enterprises, Kenya’s new LPG ambition stands to lower prices for LPG by 30 percent. At the same time, Tanzania looks forward to connecting LPG nationwide.

In April, Kenya revived the stalled subsidy scheme for affordable cooking gas, giving the LPG take up a shot in the arm.

Judge Stuart-Smith said that the UKEF was entitled to view that supporting the project under consideration was in line with obligations under the Paris Climate Change Agreement. He supported the judgement by adding that the UKEF’s view was that the project was in general alignment with Mozambique’s stated climate change policies and was acceptable and not shown to be wrong.

A spokesperson for the UK government was cited by UKEF on March 16, replying to the first judgement by Justice Thornton, saying: “We welcome the judgment and remain confident that UKEF follows robust and internationally recognized due diligence before providing any support for overseas projects.”

Considering that the judges reached no consensus, the Friends of the Earth organization, which mobilized several activists near the court on March 17, said it is awaiting a court order determining the outcome.

The activists and protestants had placards reading “Stop gas funding in Mozambique”, “keep oil in the ground”, “fossil fuels must disappear” while shouting protests against fossil fuels funding.

Senegal is looking towards learning from the mistakes of other African countries in an attempt to reverse the so-called “resource curse” that plagues many oil and gas producing African countries. In a further demonstration of enlisting public opinion, such a broad meeting was called to brain-storm for ideas and incorporate into a national development programme.
“It is extremely import to remind you all today, we remain convinced that the promotion of a participatory, multi-institutional, and collaborative approach is imperative for capable governance and guaranteeing sustainable prosperity,” stated President Macky Sall of the Republic of Senegal.
Under this new legislation, the citizens of Senegal will have a seat at the table, with civil society to play a leading role in driving the discussion surrounding the monetization of the country’s oil and gas industry. This landmark act will ensure a trickle-down economy that guarantees investments within petrochemicals, agriculture, power, gas, and transportation, thus expanding the economy and facilitating the creation of many jobs for Senegalese citizens.