Kenya

  • Majority of Kenyans buy from companies with distinctive branding a new study reveals. 
  • The study by Elite Mawu Agency reveals that more than 65 percent of  Kenyans interact with companies that have attractive branding.   
  • According to the report, branding provides an emotional link by tying people to lifestyles.

Majority of Kenyans buy from companies with distinctive branding a new study reveals. 

The study by Elite Mawu Agency reveals that more than 65 percent of Kenyans interact with companies that have attractive branding that include distinctive creative logos and branding collaterals. 

The report dubbed Kenya Branding Report Card 2022, indicates that brands with originality and creativity attracts more interaction and buy-in. 

“There are small businesses with similar products at every corner, so what makes your business different? Your brand! Stand out from the competition and develop your brand further than just a logo,” said Elite Mawu Agency  Chief Executive and

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The confirmation of William Ruto as president indicates that Kenya will remain on track with its IMF program and plans to strengthen medium-term public finances, but a sovereign credit 2022 ratings downgrade remains inevitable in the subsequent months.

  • Over the last decade, Kenya has implemented significant political and economic changes.
  • The new administration will make headway on Kenya’s fiscal consolidation.
  • Even if Ruto keeps his promises, it may be “too little, too late” to avert at least one sovereign decline by the end of 2022.

Kenya’s political and economic structure

Over the last decade, Kenya has implemented significant political and economic changes. The changes have led to sustained economic growth, social progress, and political stability. Poverty, inequality, transparency and accountability, climate change, sustained poor private sector investment, and the economy’s susceptibility to internal and external shocks remain essential development issues.

Kenya’s new constitution ushered in a new economic and political …

As Africa’s role in the global economy continues to garner prominence, it’s imperative for the continent to seal the gaping hole in its power supply.

Lack of universal power access remains a major roadblock that has retrogressed industrialization and socio-economic development. Statistics from the World Bank indicate that Africa remains the least electrified region in the world, with 568 million people lacking access to electricity.

The Bretton Woods institution, further notes that the Sub-Saharan Africa’s share of the global population without electricity, jumped to 77 per cent in 2020 from 71 per cent in 2018, whilst most regions saw declines in their share of access deficits. It has become a Hobson’s choice for African governments to prioritize the power sector, which is the epicenter of industrialization, working towards Goal 7 of the UN SDGs; which advocates for universal access to affordable, reliable and modern electricity services.

Currently, Africa’s power is …