Tanzania

Stakeholders in Tanzania are lobbying for asking the government to establish a department to research and preserve traditional foods and seeds which are feared to be in danger of extinction. “The loss of diverse diets is directly linked to diseases or health risk factors, such as diabetes and obesity,” warns

While the new seed varieties (as well as animal hybrids) are been praised for their fast growth and resistance to disease, the question remains over their nutritional value. There are also concerns that the loss of organic traditional plant and animal varieties places the world at risk of losing traditional medicines.

At a recent Agricultural Ecology (Agroecology) training workshop held in Moshi, Tanzania stakeholders emphasized that; “From providing cures to deadly diseases to maintaining natural ecosystems and improving the overall quality of life, the benefits of preserving threatened and endangered species are invaluable.”

The project uses a comprehensive approach to combat cancer, involving communities and building capacity to over 400 community health care workers, and raising awareness by printing and distributing over 3,000 books and 5,000 Information, Communications and Education (ICE) materials.

“This project aims to complement the government efforts towards reducing cancer morbidity and mortality,” said Minister of Health Ummy Mwalimu.

“The government cannot single-handedly combat the growing burden of cancer, hence we commend TCCP for their innovation towards demonstrating the success of public-private collaboration to control cancer in the country,” she added.

A careful study of the 2011 flood’s socio-economic impacts on Dar es Salaam indicated that the flood events damaged properties worth millions and the government was forced to spend a total amount of US$796,968 in rescuing and relocating vulnerable communities who lived in the low-lying areas of Dar es Salaam’s districts.

Per World Bank research, which offers clear insight into the matter, exposure to floods is a widespread phenomenon affecting at least 39 per cent of the population, or two million people, having been impacted either directly or indirectly by floods.

The April 2018 floods alone affected between 900,000 and 1.7 million people, and among the affected households, 47 per cent (18 per cent of the city’s population) reported health impacts.

Tanzania’s President Samia spearheaded the signing of some 36 MoUs. Of these, 12 were signed by government public institutions, 23 by private sector parties and one by the Revolutionary government of Zanzibar.

The President reassured investors of Tanzania’s favourable business environment. She placed emphasis on the country’s peace and political stability which she said makes Tanzania a unique investment destination where investors will enjoy open doors to invest across all sectors.

She placed a special note on the country’s potential in tourism and hospitality as well as agriculture and energy.

“Tanzania is strategically located and the port of Dar es Salaam is the gate to Africa’s interior,” she added.

The processing factory set up by Indesso may propel Tanzania to become the largest clove oil producer in Africa.

Aloyce Elia Kibiriti, the Chairman of the Msasa IBC village, said that representatives from Indesso camped in the area and chose their village to construct the proposed clove leaves-to-oil producing factory significantly for export to Indonesia.

Chairman Kibiriti added that they had already secured land for the project, saying it would create employment for the farmers who lost their farms after creating the Derema Conservation Corridor.